Eyjafjallajokull wreaks havoc on global travel [6]

By Dian Hasan | May 23, 2010

Eyjafjallajokull, Iceland and volcanic ash, are three names and words that have become inseparable from in one sentence. They have been making global headlines since the volcanic eruption earlier in the year.

This glacier in remote Iceland, with the near-impossible-to pronounce-name, has caused serious ramifications across the world, touching and affecting every one on all four corners of our planet, when travel in Europe came to a screeching halt, virtually shutting down the entire European continent. Millions of air travelers were stranded at airports, not only across Europe, but – through the ripple domino effect – felt in the far corners of the world. Impeccably demonstrating how interconnected we have all become.

Here’s an interesting – albeit by no means amusing – look at a photo-blog of the unfortunate passengers who were directly impacted, as reported by The Toronto Star on April 16, 2010.

A plume of volcanic ash rises into the atmosphere from a crater under about 656 feet (200 metres) of ice at the Eyjafjallajokull glacier in southern Iceland April 14, 2010. A huge ash cloud from the Icelandic volcano turned the skies of northern Europe into a no-fly zone on Thursday, stranding hundreds of thousands of passengers. Picture taken April 14, 2010. REUTERS/Olafur Eggertsson

An aerial handout photo from the Icelandic Coast Guard shows a plume of steam rising 22,000 feet (6,700 meters) from a crater under about 656 feet (200 metres) of ice at the Eyjafjallajokull glacier in southern Iceland April 14, 2010. The volcanic eruption on Wednesday partially melted a glacier, setting off a major flood that threatened to damage roads and bridges and forcing hundreds to evacuate from a thinly populated area. Picture taken April 14, 2010. REUTERS/Icelandic Coast Guard/Arni Saeberg/Handout

Lava spews out of a volcano in the region of the Eyjafjallajoekull glacier in southern Iceland, on March 21, 2010. The small volcano eruption that forced more than 600 people to flee their homes in Iceland over the weekend could conceivably set off a larger volcano, experts warned. AFP PHOTO/Kjartansson/AFP/Getty Images)

This picture taken on March 27, 2010 shows lava spurting out of the site of a volcanic eruption at the Fimmvorduhals volcano near the Eyjafjallajokull glacier some 125 Kms east of Reykjakic. With lava still gushing, a small Icelandic volcano that initially sent hundreds fleeing from their homes is turning into a boon for the island nation's tourism industry, as visitors flock to catch a glimpse of the eruption. AFP PHOTO/HALLDOR KOLBEINS

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